Debunking daylight savings time myths

Well, it is that time of year again.  Daylight Savings Time (DST) starts this Sunday morning and along with it starts the hysteria of DST myths.

For people who are easily frustrated by nonsensical behaviors, this is a particularly tough time of year.  However, with a little bit of myth-busting, this time of year can be a very refreshing change of pace.  Let’s review the following to see just how little effect DST has on the environment around us.

 “Makes the Days Are Longer”

This is wrong, wrong, and wrong.  In both connotations of the word “days,” this is an incorrect statement.  Firstly, a day is always 24 hours no matter how you slice it.  Secondly, daylight hours in our region flex from minimum of 10 hours at winter solstice to a maximum of 14 hours at summer solstice.  This is dependent on position relative to the North Pole not on whether the clocks are set a certain way.

“Makes Bedtime Shorter”

This has less to do with the time change and more to do with the fact that you just simply more active in the warmer months than the colder months.  For instance, going to the movies is much more popular in the warm months than the colder months.  Going to the movies takes up time that you would normally be at home sleeping.  So blame the movie theater not your clock.

“Makes More Difficult to Wake Up”

Well, if you’re getting less sleep in the summer, then likewise, it will be more difficult to wake up when you need to wake up.

“Makes People Crazy”

Again, people are not sleeping due to lifestyle decisions not the clock.

Those are just a few of the oft quoted wives’ tales that spread like wildfire this time of year.  Hopefully, this list gives you enough info to extinguish that wildfire in your life for good.

Follow Ben on Twitter @Ben_Baxter or AL.com.

Sunrise by Alex Indigo (Flickr)

Delayed Gratification is not Set in Stone

More often than not, delayed gratification is viewed as a four-letter word that means permanent denial of happiness.  That’s not a healthy definition or an accurate definition as delayed gratification is actually a temporary experience.  If it lasts forever, then it’s not delayed gratification.  That being said, it’s not hard to see why delayed gratification or healthy discipline gets a bad rap.

Hebrews 12:11

No discipline seems pleasant at the time, but painful. Later on, however, it produces a harvest of righteousness and peace for those who have been trained by it.

There are multiple applications for this verse: financial discipline, sexual discipline, athletic discipline, educational discipline, and etc.  If we want to be successful in any area of our lives, it will require some level of discipline.  There’s no way around it.

Fortunately, it becomes easier to live out Hebrews 12:11 if we don’t put all of our focus on the first sentence of the verse.  We get so caught up in the pain of discipline that we overlook the harvest of righteousness and peace.  Simply correcting that shortsightedness will change our lives forever.

Follow @Ben_Baxter on Twitter. Or find him on AL.com and TouchdownAlabama.net.

Delayed Gratification

Whether Caitlyn, Rachel, or Creflo, CONCEIT Shouldn’t Be Enabled

01 Lying is BadIt sure has been an amazingly absurd and hypocritical past few weeks, hasn’t it?  We’ve had a famous televangelist successfully convince us that he needs a $60M private jet to spread the Gospel.  We’ve had a former male Olympian (and current grandparent) lead us to believe that he is now a woman.  And just recently, we’ve uncovered that a prominent white NAACP leader has been living a lie as a black woman for that past several years.

While these three events may seem unrelated, they have a very pronounced common thread: all three people have friends, family, and internet strangers who enable their specific brand of deception.  Based on my knowledge and research, that is even worse than the original lies themselves.

Actually, let me rephrase that.  Creflo Dollar, Caitlyn Jenner, and Rachel Dolezal are all guilty of creating a narrative that simply isn’t true.  However, it is OUR willing participation in their conceit that has magnified their perception into delusions of grandeur.

That’s what happens when one starts telling lies and puffing oneself up.  Just like everyone’s mom used to say, “When you tell one lie, you gotta tell more lies to cover up the first.”  It produces a snowball effect.  As the snowball gets bigger, more and more people fall into its path.  Once rolled into the snowball, those bystanders begin lying too.

I plead that we as a nation begin to halt this enabling behavior.  Everyone’s actions and thoughts aren’t valid.  And it’s not wrong to admit that.  It’s never wrong to tell to truth.   It’s never wrong to put our selfish pride aside and accept what’s truly taking place within us and in the world around us.

_______________________

If you are of the Christian persuasion like myself, here are some supporting verses:

Proverbs 12:22 ESV

“Lying lips are an abomination to the Lord, but those who act faithfully are his delight.”

Luke 8:17 ESV

“For nothing is hidden that will not be made manifest, nor is anything secret that will not be known and come to light.”

Ephesians 4:25 ESV

“Therefore, having put away falsehood, let each one of you speak the truth with his neighbor, for we are members one of another.”

Ben Baxter is an avid writer, engineer, financial advisor, and contributor to AL.com.

Vaccines, Lightning, Lottery: What Are the Odds?

The odds of being killed in a tornado in a given year are 1 in 5,693,092.

The odds of being struck by lightning in a given year are 1 in 1,107,143.

The odds of winning the grand prize in the lottery are 1 in 175,223,510.

Thank you Mr. Lottery!

Why am I mentioning this? Why is it even relevant? Surely almost all of you have been through a tornado and survived, right? Surely every single one of you reading this has seen lightning and are still alive, right? And I am going out on a limb here, but almost certainly none of you reading this has ever won the grand prize of the lottery, correct?

I am bringing these statistics up for one simple reason: vaccines.

Yes, the scary and extremely controversial subject that somehow science doesn’t understand yet we are still pumping our kids full of them. Well, why don’t we look at some data?

Per: National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) Adjudication Categories by Vaccine for Claims Filed Calendar Year 2006 to Present.

Vaccine Alleged by Petitioner

No. of Doses Distributed US CY 2006 – CY 2013 (Source: CDC)

Compensable

Compensable Total

Dismissed/ Non-Compensable Total

Grand Total

Concession

Court Decision

Settlement

DT

652,327

1

3

4

4

8

DTaP

75,888,233

10

17

71

98

72

170

DTaP-Hep B-IPV

43,929,797

4

6

18

28

38

66

DTaP-HIB

1,135,474

0

1

1

DTaP-IPV-HIB

39,590,896

5

5

11

16

DTP

04

1

2

3

2

5

DTP-HIB

04

0

1

1

Hep A-Hep B

11,662,755

8

8

1

9

Hep B-HIB

4,796,583

1

1

1

3

1

4

Hepatitis A (Hep A)

124,212,280

2

4

20

26

18

44

Hepatitis B (Hep B)

129,820,136

2

10

35

47

34

81

HIB

83,517,849

1

4

5

4

9

HPV

67,250,524

10

62

71

80

151

Influenza5

944,000,000

36

67

728

831

165

996

IPV

58,019,052

4

4

2

6

Measles

135,660

1

1

1

Meningococcal

58,412,363

1

1

22

24

3

27

MMR

73,441,556

15

13

52

80

69

149

MMR-Varicella

11,028,270

8

7

15

8

23

Nonqualified6

N/A

0

21

21

OPV

0

1

1

3

4

Vaccine Alleged by Petitioner

No. of Doses Distributed US CY 2006 – CY 2013 (Source: CDC)

Compensable

Compensable Total

Dismissed/ Non-Compensable Total

Grand Total

Concession

Court Decision

Settlement

Pneumococcal Conjugate

132,932,107

1

5

6

13

19

Rotavirus

70,719,103

1

3

15

19

6

25

Rubella

422,548

1

1

1

Td

55,742,830

4

5

49

58

15

73

Tdap

155,106,848

11

6

74

91

11

102

TETANUS

3,836,052

3

17

20

10

30

Unspecified7

N/A

1

2

3

541

544

Varicella

90,425,492

3

5

20

28

10

38

Grand Total

2,236,678,735

114

142

1,225

1,480

1,144

2,624

Guys, this is it. This is all of the actual cases taken to court that has found vaccines accountable for an injury. All of them.

I honestly don’t want to hear,”What about the shots that the parents never took the kids to trial over!” That is a terrible argument. If your kid were “vaccine injured” and “regressed to autism,” would you not seek out legal help? There are ambulance chasers plastered over every city that work for free if no money is won, are you telling me they won’t do the same in HUGE money cases like this?

Rant over. What we see here is this: There is a 0.0000013% chance of your kid suffering an injury from a vaccine. You have a 1 in 1,300,000 chance of being injured from vaccines. Sure, you have better chance of being injured by vaccines than winning the lottery and being killed by tornadoes. Lets throw lottery out. Lets look at tornadoes. You are a little less than 5 times more likely to be injured by vaccines than you are to be killed by a tornado. That is not much. Are you fleeing tornado zones in mass exodus? No.

You are MORE likely to be injured in a lightning strike than you are by a vaccine. Do you cry foul and petition to the government to end lightning? No!

The numbers do not lie. They simply do not. If you are against vaccines, you have a 99.9999987% reason to not be. And after that, well, you are simply pleading ignorance.

The Truth About Your Ice Bucket Challenge Donations

If you are reading this, you have probably heard of the ice bucket challenge.  In short, you get nominated to take the ice bucket challenge.  Once nominated you have two options that you are supposed to choose: either donate $100 to the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Association (ALSA) or pour a bucket of ice water over your head, donate $10 to the ALSA, and nominate three more people to take the ice bucket challenge.  “Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often referred to as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord.”  It is a terrible disease that ultimately results in death. Donating money to this charity sounds like a good cause.

There are some critics. There are articles and videos that claim ALSA does not spend the money correctly.  After coming across this dissent, I became curious and decided to investigate.  How does the ALSA spend their money and is that spending appropriated correctly? Let us find out.

In this video the author says that less than 8% of the 2012 ALSA expenses went to research.  The 2012 ALSA annual report (see page 12) confirms this claim.  In the table below we can see that 7.71% of ALSA expenses went towards research.  I found it interesting that the consolidated financial summary is accompanied by this comment “The consolidated summary has not been audited or reviewed by the auditors and is not part of their financial reports.” and decided to investigate.  After investigating, I found a discrepancy.  The consolidated financial summary reports a “total combined revenue” of $55,446,772 but the total expenses for 2012 is reported as $15,435,227.  I could not reconcile the numbers in this report.  Feel free to comment if you reconcile the numbers.

Using the expenses for 2012, we see an entirely different situation.  ALSA spent $3,904,240, or 25.3% of their 2012 expenses on research.  In addition, ALSA spent $4,629,111 or 30.0% on patient and community services, $1,859,100 or 12% on public and professional education and $3,269,624 or on fundraising.  In 2012, ALSA spent a total of $13,662,075 or 88.5% of their expenses on research, fundraising, or ALS awareness leaving 11.5% for overhead. Put another way, in 2012 88 cents out of every dollar spent by ALSA went to better understanding ALS.

We find a similar trend for the 2013 year.  In 2013 the ALSA had an expense total of $25,737,701, 66.7% more than in 2012.  Of the $25,737,701, ALSA spent $6,616,367, 25.7%, on research.  While ALSA proportionally spent similar amounts of research, the total dollar amount spent on research increased in 2013.  Additionally, 91.5% of ALSA spending in 2013 went towards research, fundraising or ALS awareness leaving only 8.5% for overhead.

The trend continues for the year ending in 2014.  In 2014 the ALSA had an expense total of $26,204,122.  Of this, ALSA spent $7,170,481, 27.4%, on research.  The ALSA spent 1.7% more in 2014 on research.  Additionally, 92.7% of ALSA spending in 2014 went towards research, fundraising or ALS awareness leaving only 7.3% for overhead.

Of course this doesn’t even begin to address money and awareness raised by the ice bucket challenge.  The ALSA has raised $79.7 million  as of August 25th.  You can rest assured knowing that, for the most part, your donations are being put to good use.  But don’t just take my word for it.  The ALSA meets all the Better Business Bureau’s 20 standards for charity accountability.  In addition Charity Navigator gives them a 4 star rating.

patrick-stewart-ice-bucket-challenge

4 Ways to Keep a Pay Raise from Stealing Your Joy

Salary increases are very important to self-esteem and motivation.  However, joy is much more important.  Often times, salary increases can steal your joy—making you wish you had your old salary back.  As a by-product of this bittersweet phenomenon myself, I have several tips that you and the folks you share this article with can use to maintain joy or increase joy throughout your careers.  (Please follow the chart below as a reference guide)

Job Happiness

(1) Seek Promotions or Lateral Moves Within Current Company

This tends to be easier at larger firms; however, smaller firms may give this opportunity as well.  In an ideal world, I would have done this at the first company that I worked for after college.  The company provided a large network for career paths at the location I was stationed as well as at other locations in the region.  In fact, this type of mobility and versatility was encouraged by management (to a point).  As stated in the title of this section, sometimes you do not necessarily need a pay increase or promotion to increase your joy, you just want a change of scenery. Staying with the same company makes that possibility quite easy—as long as you like the company you are with, of course.

(2) Keep Current Job and Develop a “Side Hustle”

What if you have very predictable working hours and lots of leisure time, but the pay is awful?  That’s how I felt within Firm B in 2012.  Nothing got on my nerves more than knowing that the peers I graduated with were making more money that I was.  However, instead of being smart, my pride got the best of me—I wanted employment elsewhere.  With the amount of leisure time that I had though, getting a new job should have been the last thing I wanted to do.  I should have sought a side hustle.  A side hustle is a miniature version of the DREAM CAREER that you want in the future.  If you work 40 hours per week or less, I highly recommend this option for increasing or maintaining joy.  Use your spare time to make your dreams come true—maximizing your joy and your checking account.

(3) Reduce Personal Debt and Give Yourself a Raise

Simply put, if you eliminate your debts (student loans, car loans, credit cards, etc), you will effectively have more recreational money and investment money—you have given yourself a raise!  Not only does this mean that you have more money to have fun with, but you also have more money to invest in yourself and your family (please revisit Step 2).  Reducing your debts is completely within your control as well.  So unlike landing a promotion or snagging a raise, you do not have to depend on luck—you can depend on faith and will-power! What’s not joyous about that?!

(4) Thoroughly Vet Opportunities for Advancement before Jumping Ship

The grass isn’t always greener on the other side.  You heard me earlier mention how I had almost laughably easy working hours.  I haven’t had that type of work/life balance in years.  And the stress is definitely wearing me down.  However, this could have all been avoided if I vetted the companies that I wanted to work for as thoroughly as possible.  Sometimes this isn’t easy, but it can be done.  Ask people who currently work at the firm that you wish to apply for.  If you end up getting an interview, ask to speak to an individual who has a similar job to the one you are applying for.  And lastly, if you get some unescorted time, look for the people who have the worst jobs within sight—they might be the most honest with you! If you get “bad vibes” after doing a proper vetting, then stay put and wait for another opportunity to arise—a pay increase isn’t worth sacrificing your joy for!

#CareerJoy What are some other ways to maintain joy while also increasing your income?

Which In-Laws Should You Live Closest To?

This was a big hump to get over when my wife and I were engaged and getting married.  And I’m sure this discussion has caused a lot of heartburn for other couples as well—new relationships or old reliables.  Although you are not extrinsically valuing one set of in-laws over the other (or one spouse’s career over the other), intrinsically it tends to feel that way during the heat of battle… I mean… discussion.  But maybe this decision can get easier!

A few years ago, National Institutes of Health performed a 26-year longitudinal study that showed when a husband reported having a close relationship with his wife’s parents, the couple’s risk of divorce decreased by 20%.  Conversely, when a wife reported having a close relationship with her husband’s parents, the couple’s risk of divorce increased by 20%.

I’m not a marriage expert by any means, but if I wanted to statistically safeguard a friend’s marriage, I would automatically tell him to submit and figure out a way to live near his wife’s parents.  There is a lot of benefit from a husband modeling what humbleness and submission looks like.

This will not solve all your marriage problems (you’ll have plenty).  But maybe it will help a little.

Do you agree? Should you live near your wife’s parents as a rule of thumb?

In-Laws

Natural Awakenings… and Stupidity

A friend of mine recently turned me on to a magazine, Natural Awakenings. It is basically a magazine that promotes healthy living through natural products, green living, and naturopathy.

My friend did not turn me on to this magazine because he thought it was insightful or meaningful, he turned me on to this magazine because he saw the dangers in promoting the pseudoscience that this magazine pushes. To be fair, there are a number of pseudosciences pushed within this magazine, from editorials to advertisements. But a few, namely essential oils and naturopathy, stand out above the others. While we are on advertisements, here is an actual quote from Natural Awakenings:

“We do not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the articles and advertisements, nor are we responsible for the products and services advertised. We welcome your ideas, articles and feedback.”

Well, then. Here is some feedback. Also, please check out some informative links that I have included. I am merely trying to provide an introduction and basic overview. Arm yourself with knowledge.

What is Naturopathy?

From the opening of Wikipedia: “Naturopathy, or naturopathic medicine, is a form of alternative medicine based on a belief in vitalism, which posits that a special energy called “vital energy” or “vital force” guides bodily processes such as metabolismreproduction, growth, and adaptation. Naturopathy favors a holistic approach with non-invasive treatment and generally avoids the use of surgery and drugs.”

Such treatments include essential oils, color treatment, brainwave entrainment, homeopathy, and acupuncture, to name a few.

Straight from the Association of Naturopathic Practitioners, here are the principles and foundation of Naturopathic treatment:

  • The Healing Power of Nature (Vis Medicatrix Naturae): Naturopathic medicine recognizes an inherent self-healing process in people that is ordered and intelligent. Naturopathic physicians act to identify and remove obstacles to healing and recovery, and to facilitate and augment this inherent self-healing process.
  • Identify and Treat the Causes (ToIle Causam): The naturopathic physician seeks to identify and remove the underlying causes of illness rather than to merely eliminate or suppress symptoms.
  • First Do No Harm (Primum Non Nocere):Naturopathic physicians follow three guidelines to avoid harming the patient:
    • Utilize methods and medicinal substances which minimize the risk of harmful side effects, using the least force necessary to diagnose and treat;
    • Avoid when possible the harmful suppression of symptoms; and
    • Acknowledge, respect, and work with individuals’ self-healing process.
  • Doctor as Teacher (Docere): Naturopathic physicians educate their patients and encourage self-responsibility for health. They also recognize and employ the therapeutic potential of the doctor-patient relationship.
  • Treat the Whole Person: Naturopathic physicians treat each patient by taking into account individual physical, mental, emotional, genetic, environmental, social, and other factors. Since total health also includes spiritual health, naturopathic physicians encourage individuals to pursue their personal spiritual development.
  • Prevention: Naturopathic physicians emphasize the prevention of disease by assessing risk factors, heredity and susceptibility to disease, and by making appropriate interventions in partnership with their patients to prevent illness.”

This is a basic overview of Naturopathy, but I think we all can see what is the goal of Naturopathic medicine. It is to treat the body with the body’s own immune system by enriching it naturally with the nutrients and energy it needs. A noble task.

Where Naturopathy Falls Short

Probably the first and largest glaring issue with Naturopathy is the very foundation it is built upon, life force and vital force.  Vital force is a non-material force that appears to defy the laws of chemistry and physics. There is absolutely no scientific proof for anything that can be labeled as a vital force. Despite the many claims, life force cannot, and has never been measured. Especially by any credible scientific source.

Furthermore, a vital force is subjective. We do not know what optimal health is, it is a vitalistic concept with no real scientific or empirical measurement. Also, these “optimal health” levels and “vital forces” cannot be scientifically tested.

This isn’t just a new concept either. Medical doctors and scientists have been debunking Naturopathy for quite some time now. An early skeptic of the Naturopath, named Morris Fishbein, M.D., debunked the following Naturopath treatments and theories:

  • Aeropathy: baking the patient in a hot oven ( a personal favorite)
  • Alereos system: spinal manipulation plus heat and mechanical vibration
  • Astral healing: diagnosis and advice based on reading the patient’s horoscope (I hope I do not have to explain why a horoscope is a bad thing)
  • Autotherapy: treating infections with potions made from the patient’s infected tissues
  • Biodynamochromic diagnosis and therapy: administering colored lights while thumping on the patient’s abdomen (color therapy, which I mentioned above, is still in high use)
  • Bloodwashing with herbs
  • Chromopathy: healing with colored lights (more color therapy,s till used)
  • Electrotherapy
  • Geotherapy: treating disease with little pads of earth
  • Irido-diagnosis: diagnosis based on eye markings—now called iridology
  • Pathiatry: self-administration of spinal adjustment, massage, and traction
  • Porotherapy: treatment through pores, used to treat internal and intestinal problems
  • Practotherapy
  • Sanatology, based on the theory that acidosis and toxicosis are the two basic causes of all disease
  • Somapathy: spinal adjustment followed by applications of cold or extreme heat
  • Tropo-therapy with special nutrition based diets
  • Vit-O-Pathy, a combination of 36 other systems
  • Zodiac therapy, combining astrology and herbs
  • Zonotherapy (now called reflexology): pressing on various parts of the body to heal disease in designated body “zones.”

Most of these occurred in the 1930-1960’s. Many, if not all of these are still practiced. Despite all of modern medical science disputing the efficacy of these treatments.

The Education Needed to be A Naturopath

In the United States, there are 5 full time schools dedicated to students become a Doctor of Naturopathy. Most programs are 4 years long. These 4 years include 2 years of basic sciences and then another 2 years of rounds and outpatient clinicals. This may sound very similar to the tract of an MD program, but there are some key differences.

One difference is the sheer scope of an M.D. program. A M.D. program encompasses literally every aspect of disease, infection, treatment, surgery, and other medical practice. An M.D. program will send a prospecting doctor through every discipline of medicine before they are out of the program. Medical schools also are larger staffed, better trained, and have access to all of the current technology and theories surrounding the medical curriculum.

The rounds of a N.D. includes that of homeopathy, which has long been proven to be nothing more than a placebo affect. And in some cases, homeopathy has additives that can cause serious harm to a patient. If a person is doing rounds in disciplines that fall outside of scientific validity, one can not expect a full education that is robust with current curriculum is being obtained.

Upon completion of medical school, most doctors spend another 3-6 years specializing in a certain field, and will spend most of their time dedicated to that one part of specialization. A N.D. may start practice upon completion of school, and will practice amongst many parts of medicine, or their brand of medicine. No specialization, no extra training.

A statement from the US Department of Health, Education and Welfare:

Naturopathic theory and practice are not based upon the body of basic knowledge related to health, disease, and health care which has been widely accepted by the scientific community. Moreover, irrespective of its theory, the scope and quality of naturopathic education do not prepare the practitioner to make an adequate diagnosis and provide appropriate treatment.”

Back to the Magazine

On page 10 of the April 2014 magazine, there is an advertisement for Medical Aromatherapy Certification Classes. The Middle Earth Healing and Learning Center offers a Level One class on medical aromatherapy (essential oils). For the cost of $475, you may learn all about essential oils and their medical uses. It even encompass the dangers of using modern medicine over essential oils. Not surprisingly, you may also buy essential oils directly from them after the class.

I was honestly going to try and debunk why this is a waste of money and a bad idea. But I quickly realized I did not have to. There are almost zero credible studies championing the use of aromatherapy and essential oils as a legitimate medical use. It is snake oil. We are dealing with literal snake oil. If you are using essential oils as a legitimate form of medicine, you are going to hurt yourself or someone you know. A great little website has even more detail here: https://skeptoid.com/blog/2014/04/05/essential-oil-claims-the-dangers-keep-on-coming/

Dr. Emu’s Rx for Pain

On page 28 of the April 2014 edition, we see a lovely little add for Dr. Emu’s Rx for pain. A naturopathic medicine. A list of uses includes:

  • Diabetic neuropathy foot pain
  • arthritis pain
  • stiff joints
  • knee, neck and back pain
  • sore muscles
  • inflammation and swelling
  • clear brain fog
  • restore positive a mood
  • regenerate energy levels
  • and increase circulation

Oh my! That is quite the topical solution! From the WebMD website, it does state that Emu Oil does have some uses in relieving some inflammation pain. However, it states that it works better (if at all) for sudden acute inflammation and not long term. As a matter of fact, the very things WebMD says Emu Oil may be used for also fall under the category of insufficient evidence. So, does Emu Oil even really work? At this time, we have not done enough scientific research on emu oil to know if it is truly the miracle drug it says it is. It does have some slight positive affects on rodents done in a lab setting, but not much is known outside of that. The truth is, emu oil probably has slight very short term inflammation reducing properties, but nothing to suggest it does anything more than that.

Conclusion

Naturopathy, essential oils, emu oils, and all of these new age medicine have absolutely no basis in science. Anecdotal evidence and testimonials are not a substitute for science. Naturopathy and magazines such as Natural Awakenings make countless claims that what they offer is better than modern medicine. My thoughts? Prove it. The science community should not waste countless hours debunking your…well, bunk. If you can get in a lab and show with consensus that what you sell works, we will listen. Until, then, we want none of what you are selling.

Informative Links

http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/altbelief.html

http://skepdic.com/acupuncture.html

http://www.skepdic.com/aroma.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aromatherapy

http://www.chelationwatch.org

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/134385.php

http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/reference/naturopathy/

Atl Medicine